HARDRIDER MOTORCYCLE MAGAZINE

riumph has created a machine that combines post war styling with modern day performance – a trick they’ve carried over from the rest of their Bonneville range. It’s not the cheapest bobber out there, but it’s the classiest and packed with cool design touches and character. It takes the cool, slow-speed cruising stuff easily in its stride, but it’s surprisingly fun and capable, too. With its bespoke chassis and suspension, the Bobber actually goes, corners and steers like a sweet-handling roadster. It’s hard not to be in a constant state of disbelief that something that looks so bobbersome can perform so well. A bike with a 100-section spoked 19” wheel up front and a 16-incher at the rear (150) simply shouldn’t handle this well. Especially one that weighs 228kg dry and has just 80mm of suspension travel, which could bottom-out at the drop of a hat. But it does. It may look unbalanced with all its bulk ahead of the rider and the rear wheel somewhere in another county, but it feels short and squat. It steers lightly and carves through corners and over bumps with the precision and easy poise of a Thruxton R. It’s more fun than it has any right to be and rest assured, you’ll never get left behind by your sportsbike-riding mates on the road. Ground clearance is limited on such a low bike and you’ll sometimes graze pegs on tarmac, but only occasionally when you’re pushing hard and taking advantage of the superb grip from the bespoke Avon Cobras. You need a hard dose of back brake to complement the single disc twin-piston front when you’re pushing on, but dabbing the rear keeps the Bobber more settled mid-bend and the ant-squat effect improves ground clearance. Shorter riders will love the low 690mm seat, but taller ones will still enjoy all-day comfort. Everyone will appreciate the plush ride quality and the uncluttered view in the snazzy bar end mirrors Engine The Bobber uses the same 1200cc parallel twin-cylinder ‘High Torque’ motor as the Bonneville T120 (with it’s 10,000-mile service intervals), but it makes 10% more power and torque at 4500pm. It’s more flexible and urgent on the throttle, but still unthreatening and smooth. It purrs around town, is almost silent off the throttle and cruises at just 3500rpm at 70mph. It might only have a 9.1-litre fuel tank, but Triumph claims 69mpg, which should give you range of 138-miles, although the fuel light will come on around 100-miles. The slip-assist clutch is light and accurate, the throttle response flawless and the gears slip effortlessly through the six-speed box. But the Bobber reveals a tougher side when you poke it and it drives out of corners with such unfettered urgency you’re glad it has traction control when conditions are tricky. With more revs comes a harder, deeper engine note and a satisfying rumble from the new slash cut, pea- shooter exhausts. T

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