HARDRIDER MOTORCYCLE MAGAZINE

Imagine a Rolls Royce helicopter turbine that produces a scorching 542 hp and over 450 lb-ft of torque strapped to a bare naked motorcycle, a streetfighter. This is what Madmax Race Team brought to Elvington, UK for the Straightliners Speed Record event, leaving with three new official world records. And the best part is that its completely road legal headlights, horn, indicators and all. Imagine a Rolls Royce helicopter turbine that produces a scorching 542 hp and over 450 lb-ft of torque strapped to a bare naked motorcycle, a streetfighter. This is what Madmax Race Team brought to Elvington, UK for the Straightliners Speed Record event, leaving with three new official world records. And the best part is that its completely road legal – headlights, horn, indicators and all. Remember the Y2K turbine motorcycle that Marine Turbine Technologies (MTT) had built back in 1998? In its heyday this motorcycle created a lot of buzz due to its unique character and insane performance, ending up on every motorcycle magazines cover and, of course, in Jay Lenos garage. The last one was built in 2005, before MTT turned its focus to designing turbine-powered fracking pumps for the new booming branch of the oil industry and losing actual interest for the motorcycle that generated so much publicity for its creators. It was around that time that Maxicorp founder, Zef Eisenberg, visited MTTs headquarters in Louisiana to discuss the continuation of the turbine motorcycle project. After an agreement was met, Maxicorp Autosport Division would take over the development of the next turbine bike generation. The last Y2K motorcycle was shipped to the UK, where it was taken apart to begin the development process. During the following years, the project evolved into building a completely new prototype as the original design was deemed too outdated. Starting with the power source, the discontinued Rolls Royce 250-C18 turbine from the original Y2K had to be replaced with the C18s successor, the 250-C20B. This meant a giant leap from 240 hp (179 kW) to more than 400 hp (298 kW) in standard form, which was a lot more than the Y2Ks gear could handle. The frame had to be redesigned and strengthened. As the motorcycle is not thrust powered but wheel driven, the gearbox is apparently a vital part and the Toyota two-speed gearbox used in the Y2K had by now become totally obsolete. The development team designed and fabricated a brand new single speed gearbox with a multi plate carbon dry clutch. Most spindles and flywheels, originally made from aluminum alloy, were replaced with stronger and lighter one-off titanium parts, and the original Harley-Davidson wheels gave way to BST carbon fiber rims. For the front suspension system the weapon of choice was a racing superbike pair of inverted Marzocchi 50 mm forks, allowing for two 320 mm discs with six-pot ISR brake calipers. The engine management was assigned to a Motec ECU using custom software, developed in house with data logging capabilities and several built-in safety features. The list of changes and improvements made to the motorcycle became so long that in the end

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